Monthly Archives: December 2015

Emanuel Pastreich speaks with Alex Lightman about solar power and Korea’s future on G-Lounge (December 14, 2015)

Dec 14, 2015

This week on G-Lounge, Emanuel Pastreich interviews Alex Lightman, the renown solar energy specialist and CEO of Everblaze.

They discuss solar power and the potential of Korea to play a critical role in the future development of alternative energy.

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Part 1

Part 2

Part 3

Part 4

Paris Agreement Framework Convention on Climate Change December 12, 2015

Here is the text for the

Paris Agreement
Framework Convention on Climate Change
December 12, 2015

 

II. INTENDED NATIONALLY DETERMINED CONTRIBUTIONS

12. Welcomes the intended nationally determined contributions that have been communicated by Parties in accordance with decision 1/CP.19, paragraph 2(b);

 

13. Reiterates its invitation to all Parties that have not yet done so to communicate to the secretariat their intended nationally determined contributions towards achieving the objective of the Convention as set out in its Article 2 as soon as possible and well in advance of the twenty-second session of the Conference of the Parties (November 2016) and in a manner that facilitates the clarity, transparency and understanding of the intended nationally determined contributions;

14. Requests the secretariat to continue to publish the intended nationally determined contributions communicated by Parties on the UNFCCC website;

15. Reiterates its call to developed country Parties, the operating entities of the Financial Mechanism and any other organizations in a position to do so to provide support for the preparation and communication of the intended nationally determined contributions of Parties that may need such support;

16. Takes note of the synthesis report on the aggregate effect of intended nationally determined contributions communicated by Parties by 1 October 2015, contained in document FCCC/CP/2015/7;

17. Notes with concern that the estimated aggregate greenhouse gas emission levels in 2025 and 2030 resulting from the intended nationally determined contributions do not fall within least-cost 2 ˚C scenarios but rather lead to a projected level of 55 gigatonnes in 2030, and also notes that much greater emission reduction efforts will be required than those associated with the intended nationally determined contributions in order to hold the increase in the global average temperature to below 2 ˚C above pre-industrial levels by 1 Endorsed by decision 2/CP.

18, paragraph 2. FCCC/CP/2015/L.9/Rev.1 4 reducing emissions to 40 gigatonnes or to 1.5 ˚C above pre-industrial levels by reducing to a level to be identified in the special report referred to in paragraph 21 below; 18. Also notes, in this context, the adaptation needs expressed by many developing country Parties in their intended nationally determined contributions;

19. Requests the secretariat to update the synthesis report referred to in paragraph 16 above so as to cover all the information in the intended nationally determined contributions communicated by Parties pursuant to decision 1/CP.20 by 4 April 2016 and to make it available by 2 May 2016;

20. Decides to convene a facilitative dialogue among Parties in 2018 to take stock of the collective efforts of Parties in relation to progress towards the long-term goal referred to in Article 4, paragraph 1, of the Agreement and to inform the preparation of nationally determined contributions pursuant to Article 4, paragraph 8, of the Agreement;

21. Invites the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change to provide a special report in 2018 on the impacts of global warming of 1.5 °C above pre-industrial levels and related global greenhouse gas emission pathways; III. DECISIONS TO GIVE EFFECT TO THE AGREEMENT MITIGATION

22. Invites Parties to communicate their first nationally determined contribution no later than when the Party submits its respective instrument of ratification, accession, or approval of the Paris Agreement. If a Party has communicated an intended nationally determined contribution prior to joining the Agreement, that Party shall be considered to have satisfied this provision unless that Party decides otherwise;

23. Urges those Parties whose intended nationally determined contribution pursuant to decision 1/CP.20 contains a time frame up to 2025 to communicate by 2020 a new nationally determined contribution and to do so every five years thereafter pursuant to Article 4, paragraph 9, of the Agreement;

24. Requests those Parties whose intended nationally determined contribution pursuant to decision 1/CP.20 contains a time frame up to 2030 to communicate or update by 2020 these contributions and to do so every five years thereafter pursuant to Article 4, paragraph 9, of the Agreement;

25. Decides that Parties shall submit to the secretariat their nationally determined contributions referred to in Article 4 of the Agreement at least 9 to 12 months in advance of the relevant meeting of the Conference of the Parties serving as the meeting of the Parties to the Paris Agreement with a view to facilitating the clarity, transparency and understanding of these contributions, including through a synthesis report prepared by the secretariat;

26. Requests the Ad Hoc Working Group on the Paris Agreement to develop further guidance on features of the nationally determined contributions for consideration and adoption by the Conference of the Parties serving as the meeting of the Parties to the Paris Agreement at its first session;

27. Agrees that the information to be provided by Parties communicating their nationally determined contributions, in order to facilitate clarity, transparency and understanding, may include, as appropriate, inter alia, quantifiable information on the reference point (including, as appropriate, a base year), time frames and/or periods for implementation, scope and coverage, planning processes, assumptions and methodological approaches including those for estimating and accounting for anthropogenic greenhouse gas FCCC/CP/2015/L.9/Rev.1 5 emissions and, as appropriate, removals, and how the Party considers that its nationally determined contribution is fair and ambitious, in the light of its national circumstances, and how it contributes towards achieving the objective of the Convention as set out in its Article 2;

28. Requests the Ad Hoc Working Group on the Paris Agreement to develop further guidance for the information to be provided by Parties in order to facilitate clarity, transparency and understanding of nationally determined contributions for consideration and adoption by the Conference of the Parties serving as the meeting of the Parties to the Paris Agreement at its first session;

29. Also requests the Subsidiary Body for Implementation to develop modalities and procedures for the operation and use of the public registry referred to in Article 4, paragraph 12, of the Agreement, for consideration and adoption by the Conference of the Parties serving as the meeting of the Parties to the Paris Agreement at its first session;

30. Further requests the secretariat to make available an interim public registry in the first half of 2016 for the recording of nationally determined contributions submitted in accordance with Article 4 of the Agreement, pending the adoption by the Conference of the Parties serving as the meeting of the Parties to the Paris Agreement of the modalities and procedures referred to in paragraph 29 above;

31. Requests the Ad Hoc Working Group on the Paris Agreement to elaborate, drawing from approaches established under the Convention and its related legal instruments as appropriate, guidance for accounting for Parties’ nationally determined contributions, as referred to in Article 4, paragraph 13, of the Agreement, for consideration and adoption by the Conference of the Parties serving as the meeting of the Parties to the Paris Agreement at its first session, which ensures that: (a) Parties account for anthropogenic emissions and removals in accordance with methodologies and common metrics assessed by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and adopted by the Conference of the Parties serving as the meeting of the Parties to the Paris Agreement; (b) Parties ensure methodological consistency, including on baselines, between the communication and implementation of nationally determined contributions; (c) Parties strive to include all categories of anthropogenic emissions or removals in their nationally determined contributions and, once a source, sink or activity is included, continue to include it; (d) Parties shall provide an explanation of why any categories of anthropogenic emissions or removals are excluded;

32. Decides that Parties shall apply the guidance mentioned in paragraph 31 above to the second and subsequent nationally determined contributions and that Parties may elect to apply such guidance to their first nationally determined contribution;

33. Also decides that the Forum on the Impact of the Implementation of response measures, under the subsidiary bodies, shall continue, and shall serve the Agreement;

34. Further decides that the Subsidiary Body for Scientific and Technological Advice and the Subsidiary Body for Implementation shall recommend, for consideration and adoption by the Conference of the Parties serving as the meeting of the Parties to the Paris Agreement at its first session, the modalities, work programme and functions of the Forum on the Impact of the Implementation of response measures to address the effects of the implementation of response measures under the Agreement by enhancing cooperation amongst Parties on understanding the impacts of mitigation actions under the Agreement FCCC/CP/2015/L.9/Rev.1 6 and the exchange of information, experiences, and best practices amongst Parties to raise their resilience to these impacts;*

36. Invites Parties to communicate, by 2020, to the secretariat mid-century, long-term low greenhouse gas emission development strategies in accordance with Article 4, paragraph 19, of the Agreement, and requests the secretariat to publish on the UNFCCC website Parties’ low greenhouse gas emission development strategies as communicated;

37. Requests the Subsidiary Body for Scientific and Technological Advice to develop and recommend the guidance referred to under Article 6, paragraph 2, of the Agreement for adoption by the Conference of the Parties serving as the meeting of the Parties to the Paris Agreement at its first session, including guidance to ensure that double counting is avoided on the basis of a corresponding adjustment by Parties for both anthropogenic emissions by sources and removals by sinks covered by their nationally determined contributions under the Agreement; 38. Recommends that the Conference of the Parties serving as the meeting of the Parties to the Paris Agreement adopt rules, modalities and procedures for the mechanism established by Article 6, paragraph 4, of the Agreement on the basis of: (a) Voluntary participation authorized by each Party involved; (b) Real, measurable, and long-term benefits related to the mitigation of climate change; (c) Specific scopes of activities; (d) Reductions in emissions that are additional to any that would otherwise occur; (e) Verification and certification of emission reductions resulting from mitigation activities by designated operational entities; (f) Experience gained with and lessons learned from existing mechanisms and approaches adopted under the Convention and its related legal instruments; 39. Requests the Subsidiary Body for Scientific and Technological Advice to develop and recommend rules, modalities and procedures for the mechanism referred to in paragraph 38 above for consideration and adoption by the Conference of the Parties serving as the meeting of the Parties to the Paris Agreement at its first session; 40. Also requests the Subsidiary Body for Scientific and Technological Advice to undertake a work programme under the framework for non-market approaches to sustainable development referred to in Article 6, paragraph 8, of the Agreement, with the objective of considering how to enhance linkages and create synergy between, inter alia, mitigation, adaptation, finance, technology transfer and capacity-building, and how to facilitate the implementation and coordination of non-market approaches; 41. Further requests the Subsidiary Body for Scientific and Technological Advice to recommend a draft decision on the work programme referred to in paragraph 40 above, taking into account the views of Parties, for consideration and adoption by the Conference of the Parties serving as the meeting of the Parties to the Paris Agreement at its first session; ADAPTATION * Paragraph 35 has been deleted, and subsequent paragraph numbering and cross references to other paragraphs within the document will be amended at a later stage. FCCC/CP/2015/L.9/Rev.1 7 42. Requests the Adaptation Committee and the Least Developed Countries Expert Group to jointly develop modalities to recognize the adaptation efforts of developing country Parties, as referred to in Article 7, paragraph 3, of the Agreement, and make recommendations for consideration and adoption by the Conference of the Parties serving as the meeting of the Parties to the Paris Agreement at its first session;

43. Also requests the Adaptation Committee, taking into account its mandate and its second three-year workplan, and with a view to preparing recommendations for consideration and adoption by the Conference of the Parties serving as the meeting of the Parties to the Paris Agreement at its first session: (a) To review, in 2017, the work of adaptation-related institutional arrangements under the Convention, with a view to identifying ways to enhance the coherence of their work, as appropriate, in order to respond adequately to the needs of Parties; (b) To consider methodologies for assessing adaptation needs with a view to assisting developing countries, without placing an undue burden on them; 44. Invites all relevant United Nations agencies and international, regional and national financial institutions to provide information to Parties through the secretariat on how their development assistance and climate finance programmes incorporate climate-proofing and climate resilience measures; 45. Requests Parties to strengthen regional cooperation on adaptation where appropriate and, where necessary, establish regional centres and networks, in particular in developing countries, taking into account decision 1/CP.16, paragraph 13;

46. Also requests the Adaptation Committee and the Least Developed Countries Expert Group, in collaboration with the Standing Committee on Finance and other relevant institutions, to develop methodologies, and make recommendations for consideration and adoption by the Conference of the Parties serving as the meeting of the Parties to the Paris Agreement at its first session on: (a) Taking the necessary steps to facilitate the mobilization of support for adaptation in developing countries in the context of the limit to global average temperature increase referred to in Article 2 of the Agreement; (b) Reviewing the adequacy and effectiveness of adaptation and support referred to in Article 7, paragraph 14(c), of the Agreement; 47. Further requests the Green Climate Fund to expedite support for the least developed countries and other developing country Parties for the formulation of national adaptation plans, consistent with decisions 1/CP.16 and 5/CP.17, and for the subsequent implementation of policies, projects and programmes identified by them; LOSS AND DAMAGE 48. Decides on the continuation of the Warsaw International Mechanism for Loss and Damage associated with Climate Change Impacts, following the review in 2016; 49. Requests the Executive Committee of the Warsaw International Mechanism to establish a clearinghouse for risk transfer that serves as a repository for information on insurance and risk transfer, in order to facilitate the efforts of Parties to develop and implement comprehensive risk management strategies;

50. Also requests the Executive Committee of the Warsaw International Mechanism to establish, according to its procedures and mandate, a task force to complement, draw upon the work of and involve, as appropriate, existing bodies and expert groups under the Convention including the Adaptation Committee and the Least Developed Countries Expert Group, as well as relevant organizations and expert bodies outside the Convention, to FCCC/CP/2015/L.9/Rev.1 8 develop recommendations for integrated approaches to avert, minimize and address displacement related to the adverse impacts of climate change;

51. Further requests the Executive Committee of the Warsaw International Mechanism to initiate its work, at its next meeting, to operationalize the provisions referred to in paragraphs 49 and 50 above, and to report on progress thereon in its annual report; 52. Agrees that Article 8 of the Agreement does not involve or provide a basis for any liability or compensation;

 

Paris Agreement

Paris Agreement in PDF

Returning to the countryside for a brighter future

I received a letter about a month ago from a young woman who had decided to start life as a farmer in rural Korea. Although the numbers are not enormous, the return to the farm is a meaningful trend. Moreover, farming offers the greatest potential for responding to the problem of unemployment among youth. If we could break up factory farms in the United States and give the land in small grants to young people, we could greatly improve the economy and bring higher stability to society. Not to mention the fact that small farmers take better care of the land.

Here is an ad I saw at Kyung Hee University concerning opportunities to return to farming. The title reads “the scholarship program for rural farms and fishing villages has been improved.”

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TAI Seminar series with important intellectuals: “The past and future of Asia”

TAI The Asia Institute has been carrying out a seminar series with major thinkers on East Asia and the United States which has been published for the most part through “The Diplomat”

 

Please see the following links for the interviews in English

 

 

AI logo smallSeminar_series_Logo1_Color

 

 

 

The Diplomat

Interview: Benjamin Elman

“The ‘rise of China’ narrative can be read in different ways, and for Japan it is a challenge.”

December 10, 2015

Emanuel Pastreich

 

The Diplomat

Interview: Lawrence Wilkerson

A discussion of tensions in East Asia, and some possible solutions

By Emanuel Pastreich

December 03, 2015

The Diplomat

Asia Institute Interview with Alexis Dudden

Alexis Dudden on tensions in East Asia

November 27, 2015

 

The Diplomat

Asia Institute Interview with Joseph Nye

“The U.S. and China are deeply entangled, and that state is largely a good thing.”

The Diplomat October 30. 2015

The Diplomat

Asia Institute Interview with Richard Bush

Insights into the economies of Northeast Asia

October 22, 2015

The Diplomat

Asia Institute Interview with Francis Fukuyama

Francis Fukuyama on the rise of China, East Asia tensions, and the role of the United States

October 15, 2015

The Diplomat

Asia Institute Interview with Ezra Vogel

Ezra Vogel on managing relations in Northeast Asia

The Diplomat September 29, 2015

“한국에 필요한 건 혁신일까 용기 일까” (중앙일보 2015년 12월12일)

중앙일보

“한국에 필요한 건 혁신일까 용기일까?

2015년 12월 12일

임마누엘 페스트라이쉬

 

한국에 혁신이 필요하다는 말은 이전에도 자주 나왔다. 그러나 요즘에는 한국에 혁신보다 용기가 더 필요하다는 생각이 든다. 물론 혁신과 용기가 함께 조합된다면 금상첨화일 것이다. 한국의 경제적 난제에 대한 답은 분명하다. 수입의 상당 부분을 차지하는 화석연료에 대한 의존을 대폭 줄이면 수출이 제자리걸음을 계속해도 고속 경제성장에 버금가는 경제 효과를 누릴 수 있다.

이는 다음 세대에 대한 도덕적 책임이기도 하다. 프랑스 파리에서 열린 유엔 기후변화협약 당사국 총회는 화석연료 소비가 가져오는 위험을 엄중히 경고하며 다음 세대에 대한 우리의 의무를 상기시켰다. 전 세계 개도국이 한국을 벤치마크로 삼는 만큼 한국의 빠른 화석연료 감축은 국경을 초월한 효과를 가진다.

안보 측면에서도 한국은 화석연료 사용을 줄여야만 한다. 국내 발전 재생가능에너지로 20~30년 내 (혹은 그보다 먼저) 100% 에너지 자급자족을 이루겠다는 목표가 무역에 부정적 영향을 줄 수 있다는 우려도 있지만 안보는 이런 모든 우려보다 우선시된다.

한국이 북한과 충돌을 빚고, 그 결과 한반도 무역에 급제동이 걸린다고 생각해 보자. 군사력이 우위에 있어도 무기 시스템에 전력을 공급할 화석연료가 없다면 빠르게 무력화될 수 있다. 부산이나 인천을 통해 연료가 수입되지 못하면 며칠 지나지 않아 많은 도시가 마비된다. 이런 시나리오에서는 한국의 승리를 보장할 수 없다.

한국의 경제 및 산업 전략에서 혁명적 변화가 필요한 때다. 조선산업을 발전시킨 1967년의 5개년 경제개혁에서 볼 수 있었던 장기적 비전도 마련해야 한다. 100% 재생가능 에너지를 달성하겠다는 목표는 유의미한 5개년 경제계획을 수립하는 또 다른 기회가 될 수도 있다.

한국은 터빈과 전자, 전기 배터리, 태양전지 패널에서 필요한 기술을 보유하고 있다. 관건은 정부다. 재생에너지로의 전환을 가속화하기 위해서는 정부의 적극적 주도가 필요하다. 초기에는 군이 주도적 역할을 담당할 수 있다. 다른 경제 부문과 달리 군은 2년 내 모든 차량을 전기차로 교체하고 국가안보를 위해 모든 관련 건물에 태양전지를 사용할 것을 지시하고 밀어붙일 수 있다. 군이 대규모 태양전지와 풍력발전, 전기 배터리 시장을 열어 주면 장비 유지 보수를 위해 필요한 전문가의 수도 빠르게 증가하고, 기업은 군이 보장하는 시장 수요를 믿고 향후 발전을 위해 대대적인 투자를 단행할 수 있다.

조선업의 경우 모든 선박에 보다 높은 에너지 효율 기준을 적용하고 모든 선박의 전체 표면에 풍력 터빈이나 태양 패널을 장착해 선박에서 사용하는 에너지의 상당 부분을 자가 발전하도록 요구해야 한다. 삼면이 바다로 둘러싸인 지리적 특징을 이용해 이동식 대규모 해상 풍력발전소를 다수 설치하는 방식도 가능하다.

자동차 부문도 마찬가지다. 정부는 5년 내 모든 자동차를 전기자동차로 교체하도록 독려하고 그렇게 하는 사람에게 충분한 보조금을 지급해야 한다(정해진 기한 이후에도 전기자동차로 교체하지 않은 사람에게는 높은 탄소세를 부과해야 한다). 이는 제조업 부양으로 한국 경제를 활성화시킬 뿐 아니라 자동차 소유주들이 가정용 태양전지를 이용해 가정에서 자동차 연료를 충전할 수 있게 해 준다. 대기 질 개선과 에너지 독립, 글로벌 자동차 시장에서의 새로운 경쟁력 확보를 생각하면 보조금 비용은 결코 많은 게 아니다.

정부 청사 건물부터 시작해 모든 상업 및 거주용 건물에 최고로 엄격한 단열 기준을 적용하고 건물 표면에 태양전지를, 모든 창문에 투명 태양전지 패널을 설치하는 것을 의무화해야 한다. 이를 예외 없이 적용하는 한편 낡은 집은 규제에 맞게 수리하는 보조금을 지급해야 한다. 에너지 효율이 높은 단열시설을 설치하고 태양전지와 소형 풍력발전기를 낡은 건물에 적용하는 공사를 실시하면 청년 일자리도 효과적으로 창출할 수 있다.

전기 비행기 개발 또한 잠재력이 높다. 이미 지적재산권을 다른 국가가 통제하는 전투기나 상업용 제트기 분야에서는 한국이 뒤처질지 모르지만 이제 막 발전을 시작한 전기 비행기 시장은 한국에도 활짝 열려 있다. 전자산업에서 한국이 가진 저력을 이용한다면 한국은 큰 변화를 만들어낼 수 있다. 화석연료 비행기가 구시대의 산물이 되는 시점을 20년 후로 잡는다면 전기 비행기 시장 선점을 위해 당장 행동에 나서야 하는 때는 바로 지금이다.

마지막으로, 미래 수요를 충족시킬 만큼 빠르게 규모를 키우기 위해서는 재생가능 에너지 산업의 주요 주체와 협력적 관계를 잘 활용해야 한다. 2011년 덴마크와 체결한 ‘녹색동맹’은 녹색기술 개발 협업을 증진하는 데 많은 공헌을 했다. 2050년까지 100% 재생가능 에너지를 달성하겠다는 덴마크의 목표는 한국에도 많은 시사점을 안겨줄 것이다.

 

 

 

한국에 필요한 건 혁신일까 용기 일까

 

 

 

 

Interview: Benjamin Elman The Diplomat, December 10, 2015

 

The Diplomat

Interview: Benjamin Elman

“The ‘rise of China’ narrative can be read in different ways, and for Japan it is a challenge.”

December 10, 2015

Emanuel Pastreich

 

 

When people talk about the future of East Asia, and the potential for integration, they say,“Well, Europe has been integrated from Roman times but East Asia has no such precedent. In fact Japan has never really been part of a unified architecture in Asia.” Is there something in the way East Asia has evolved in the 2,000 years that limits future integration, or is that not an assumption we should make?

In order to understand global issues, one needs to understand the regional issues that undergird them. China, Japan, Korea, and to some degree Vietnam and other portions of South Asia have become a very viable regional group. China is increasingly influenced by the nations around it in economics and politics. To understand the region’s potential, we need to consider the historical development of the Chinese empire, the economic impact of the Tokugawa government (17th-19th centuries), and, ultimately, how Korea was a part of economic and scientific change influencing both sides.

Korea often served as a conduit for medical knowledge, for Buddhist and Confucian metaphysics, and for technological innovations. Korea has been caught in the middle historically as China continued to surpass Korea in terms of its military and economic power and influence in East Asia during the Ming and Qing dynasties. I think that when Japan’s Toyotomi Hideyoshi led invasions (1592 and 1597) of Korea that fundamentally altered the geopolitical landscape and reduced Korea’s role in the economic and political order of the region.

We tend to underestimate just how big Japan was in the global economy in the 16th and 17th centuries. The Tokugawa reunification of Japan after the battle of Sekigahara (1600) brought together a population of 25-27 million under a highly disciplined military. That meant that Japan was not just an island, but a powerful state capable not only of invading Korea and marching all the way to the Yalu River, but also capable of challenging the Ming Dynasty. Innovations in naval warfare and the decision of the Ming to throw their full weight into the campaign against Japan meant that Hideyoshi was forced to give up the campaign against the Ming, but the consequences of that campaign were that Korea was devastated and is only now starting to recover its self-confidence. The Gyeongbok Palace remained in ruins until the middle of the 19th century. Japan took advantage of Korea’s decline. Read more of this post

Renminbi’s new status and its implications

The Chinese renminbi has been added to the basket of global currencies making up the International Monetary Fund’s special drawing rights (SDRs).

Stratfor notes in this article that this is the first time ever that a currency of a nation not allied with the US is included. Previously only

US dollar, the British pound, the Japanese yen & the euro were in SDR.

See article below:

https://www.stratfor.com/sample/weekly/china-and-changing-global-economic-order

The significance is tremendous and I would suggest that the US has no choice at this point but to come to an understanding at a high level with China concerning economic cooperation–and cooperation on the environment, security and many other fields as well.

“한국다움을 찾아서” KBS 2015년 12월 5일

2015년 12월 5일

KBS

한국다움 문화대한민국 1편

“한국다움을 찾아서”

이만열의 출연

 

http://www.liveusa.net/index.php?document_srl=96302&mid=board_3#

“Future Life with Pepper” @ Softbank

Japan faces an unprecedented collapse in its population and a rapidly aging society. Moreover, more and more Japanese find themselves living alone, often unmarried and without children. It is in this context that Softbank, launched a new domestic robot “Pepper” which is aimed as much as serving as a companion as it is as a tool.

 

 

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In the following video, Pepper is shown serving as a cheerleader of sorts for various families. Most striking is the

lonely woman in the first scene who seeks comfort and affection from Pepper.

 

Pepper is above all a reminder that the combination of an aging, childless society with computer technology developing at an

exponential rate will produce some rather unusual social phenomena. Above all, we are reminded that the future is not that far away at

all. Like climate change, it is already here with us right now.

 

 

Here is the video used in the ad:

 

“Future life with Pepper”

 

http://www.softbank.jp/robot/movies/20150618/

The North Korea table at Kyobo

Kyobo Books has a whole table piled up with books about North Korea.

The woman defector in search of freedom seems to be a popular genre.

 

 

 

 

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