Category Archives: Asia Institute

The Asia Institute “Post-peace march account” in The Korea Times

The Korea Times

“Post-peace march account”

May 21, 2017

 

Meenakshi Pawar

 

On May 15, the Asia Institute and the Korea Peace Movement ― both deeply concerned about the fast deteriorating situation on the Korean Peninsula ― brought together their first peace march in downtown Seoul. Institute members feel they must raise their voices before it is too late and our children and dear ones are vaporized in the coming nuclear fire, and inform authorities that something must be done to address the growing concerns of citizens.

A broad section of Korean society participated in the march, including academics, business people, housewives, school teachers and students. Professor Emanuel Pastreich, director of the Asia Institute, opened the event. In his speech, he emphasized that no matter how small we are today, we must take the first step in the right direction. It takes an act of bravery to resist a wrong in society. Having gone through so much pain and suffering in the past few months because of the fear of nuclear war, we can no longer sit quietly in our homes and hope for this terrifying situation to return to normal. He said if others are preparing to wage war, we must come out in the streets and start waging peace. Read more of this post

Asia Institute Seminar: “India’s Strategic Interests in East Asia”

 

Asia Institute Seminar

Saturday, June 17, 2017

5-6:30 PM

 

Rahul Raj

Professor

Sejong University

 

“India’s Strategic Interests in East Asia”

 

 

Introductory Remarks:

Emanuel Pastreich

Director

The Asia Institute

 

 

Asia Institute Chungmuro Office

8th Floor

24, Chungmuro 11-gil Jung-gu Seoul, Korea

 

중구충무로 11길 24번지 8층

02 2277-7132

 

 

India has taken a deeper interest in East Asia as it strives to define its new global role. This seminar will consider what India is looking for, who are the different parties competing to define India’s strategy and what are the prospects for the future.

Although India’s engagement with East Asia dates back to thousands of years, much of the developments in the realm of the business and strategic relations developed in the post-1990s to project itself as a regional power when it opened its market and launched its “Look East Policy”. Under this policy, it initiated forging several economic and commercial ties and also enhanced security partnerships with like-minded countries who are concerned with the increasing influence of China in the region. In the early years, the Look East Policy was primarily focused on the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). India has since expanded the geographic domain of its policy to include Korea, Japan, China, and Australia.

As the power balance is moving from the western hemisphere to Asia-pacific region wherein the rise of China and the US’s pivot to Asia define the foreign policy debate in many countries, New Delhi has also crafted its foreign policy to stay abreast. The Indian Prime Minister, Narendra Modi led government soon after its emphatic victory in 2014 re-crafted the India’s “Look East Policy” to “Act East Policy” wherein it has sought to actively engage the Asian partners both from the economic as well as security perspective. This can be gauged by the fact that Asia has become one of the most focused areas of the present government. The Modi government has forged and revitalized several strategic partnerships and also tried to put impetus in the existing partnerships with countries which had lost its sheen due to India’s own policy paralysis in the last few years. The strategic interest is not only confined to military but it also includes economic interests. India is the second biggest market with its rapidly ballooning middle class wherein most of the Asian tigers including Korea, Taiwan, Singapore, Japan, and many others have huge strategic interests in the world’s fastest growing economy.

 

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KOREA PEACE MARCH (MAY 14, 2 PM)

Sunday, May 15 2017

2 PM

March for Peace

@

Front of Sejong Culture Center

Gwanghwamun, Seoul

 

MAY 14 PEACE MARCH

The Korea Peace Movement and the Asia Institute are holding a March for Peace on Sunday, May 15, starting at 2 PM in front of the Sejong Culture in Gwanghwamun, Seoul.

 

We live in an age in which conflict and destruction has torn so many countries apart and there is a real threat of world war if we do not make an effort to promote peaceful cooperation and offer up a peaceful model for how we can combine forces to address the tremendous challenges of our age.

 

Please do join us for this march and show that world that it is not enough to stand by in silence, we must actively wage peace.

 

“The US and Korean New President” with Costello & Pastreich @ National Assembly

“The US and Korean New President”

Stephen Costello

President of ProGlobal Consulting and Host of AsiaEast

 

Moderated by

Emanuel Pastreich

Director of the Asia Institute

Friday, May 12

10 AM to 12 PM

National Assembly

Seminar Room 2

의원회관 제2 세미나실

(C)2008 Kyu Lee

STEPHEN COSTELLO is a policy analyst with 20 years of experience in Korea and Northeast Asia as political consultant, policy analyst, think tank program director, and tech-sector business consultant.  Mr. Costello specializes in policy and politics in Korea and Northeast Asia as well as US policy and policy-making toward the region.

pastreich and ai

 

Emanuel Pastreich is the director of the Asia Institute and associate professor at Kyung Hee University in Seoul.

 

March for Science in Seoul

I was there for the entire March for Science in Seoul last Saturday and had a chance to talk to a variety of teachers and students.

 

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You can see me on the far right

 

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The woman pushing the woman in the wheel chair is wearing one of the Asia Institute’s “Stop Climate change” pins. 

“THE ROAD TO A SHRINKING SOCIETY” MATSUHISA HIROSHI MAY 15, 2017

ASIA INSTITUTE SEMINAR

6:00-7:30 PM

 

Monday, MAY 15, 2017

 

“THE ROAD TO A SHRINKING SOCIETY”

How to make ourselves truly renewable

 

WCO ANGUK

3RD FLOOR

(SEE MAP)

MATSUHISA HIROSHI

PROFESSOR  EMERITIS

KYOTO UNIVERSITY

SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING

After the meltdowns at the Fukushima nuclear power plants in 2011, Japanese public opinion has been divided into three groups: those who want to continue using it, those who want to phase it out and those who want to end its use immediately. The establishment has argued that nuclear power is required for the economy and recently the Abe Administration has pushed for restarting plants as part of his agenda for growth.

The choice is one rather of choosing the future of Japan and goes far beyond nuclear power. If we continue this rate of “growth” we will exhaust all our resources in the near future. Even 2% growth will assure us that we will use up what resources we have in fifty years, rather than one hundred.

War and catastrophe will be the consequences of the radical exhaustion of resources.

         There is much talk about a sustainable society today, but the term “sustainable” is used in a vague sense with no concrete guidelines.

Some in industry see it as meaning the sustaining of current growth into the future, the complete opposite of the environmentalists demand for limited consumption.

We must face the truth and reduce real consumption. If we reduce consumption by 1% every year, a 100 year reserve can be continued indefinitely. If we reduce more than that, we can build up a reserve. We must design a smaller society for the sake of future generations in order to avoid catastrophe.

The current economic system is based on mass production and mass consumption. As a result, our lives are flooded with industrial products to which we have become addicted. Our ever-growing society is already showing the signs of discordance as a result of this consumption illness.  A smaller society, on the other hand, supports local production and consumption, and requires less energy. We will have a more healthy society if people are not addicted to industrial products and anonymous consumption but rather nurture each other and promote a creative life.

WCO Anguk

“청년들이 바라보는 헬조선 및 5.9선거” 2오후 아시아인스티튜트 017년 4월 17일

“청년들이 바라보는 헬조선 및 5.9선거”

2017년 4월 17일

오후 7:00-8:00

아시아인스티튜트

&

어울려사세 시민연단

  

사회:

이만열 EMANUEL PASTREICH

아시아인스티튜트 소장

발표자:

최장현

벤자민인성영재학교

전상구  & 박경홍

경희대학교 국제대학 대학생

최근 청년들이 헬조선 이란 현상을 심각하게 우려 하고 있지만 많은 경우 직접 자기 의견을 말하고 해결 방법에 대한 제안을 할 기회도 없습니다. 그리고 자기 주장을 잘 할 방법도 모르는 경우 가 많습니다.   이번 세미나에는 청년의 목소리를 직접 듣고 자유로은 대화 할 수 있는 공간이 제공됩니다.

장소:

World Citizen’s Organization

어울려사세 시민연단

서울시 주구 장충동 1가 118 ( 동호로 240)
wco map

Cooperation in the Future of East Asian Security (April 12 TAI Seminar)

 

1AI logo small

The Asia Institute

&

The Tomorrow

Present

 

Wed, April 12, 2017

5-6 PM

 

 

Cooperation in the Future of East Asian Security

How the United States can work together with Korea, Japan & China

 

Opening Remarks:

Rei-Kyung Lee

Chairman

The Tomorrow

Presentation:

Emanuel Pastreich

Director

The Asia Institute

 

Response:

Lee Jong-heon 

Deputy Secretary General

Trilateral Cooperation Secretariat 

 

Although the media is full of reports about increasing tensions in East Asia, the rapid development of technology and the impact of climate change is such that there is increasingly a need for global cooperation in security especially in the fields of non-traditional security. This seminar brings together a group of experts and world citizens to discuss how the United States and Korea can cooperate with China and Japan to respond to new security challenges such as cyber attacks, drones, organized crime, immigration challenges, spreading deserts, and other risks related to the onset of climate change. The seminar will also touch on the possible uses for an East Asian arms control treaty and other general agreements on emerging technologies.  


Sookmyung Women’s University

Centennial Hall

608 CENTENNIAL HALL

 

 

 

 

 

 

Emanuel Pastreich, Benjamin Butler & Kim Haesun to speak at Asia Pacific Financial Forum

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The Emerging Future Institute will play a substantial role at the Asia Pacific Financial Forum at the Plaza Hotel, March 23-25 with its founder Benjamin Butler, Kim Haesun, President of SunTransGlobe and researcher at Emerging Future Institute, and Emanuel Pastreich, director of the Asia Institute and researcher at the Emerging Future Institute, speaking.

 

March 22, 2017

SESSION Ⅱ : G2

Trade conflicts & the new isolationism age  무역충돌과 신고립주의 시대 (통상)

 

Emanuel Pastreich

10:00-10:30 AM

“The Challenge of the Trump Era: Opportunities and Challenges”

For more information, see

제10회 아시아태평양금융포럼

Talk at Refuge P-Nan (피난처) center for refugees in Seoul

I visited Refuge P-Nan (피난처) to meet with three of the political refugees living there and meet with their hard working staff and a group of student volunteers. A total of eight political refugees live on site and there are education programs for other refugees in Korea as well. I was greeted by the director Lee Hotaek (이호택) who showed me around and explained me how the number of people applying for refugee status in Korea has increased rapidly and how the members of Refuge P-Nan work to help refugees settle into Korean culture and also to raise awareness among Koreans about the importance of supporting refugees. Director Lee told me that Korea was the first Asian country to pass a law on refugees and that although the numbers of refugees who are admitted is still low, that Korea has now surpassed Japan.

I spoke about my experiences as a foreigner in Korea and also discussed how war and climate change will make refugee issues central in this century.

 

I agreed that I would give talks for refugees in the future and make an effort to contribute to their projects. I feel strongly that the best way to avoid feeling sorry for oneself about the difficulties of living in a foreign country is to work together with people who face far greater challenges.

 

The outside of Refuge P-Nan

The outside of Refuge P-Nan

 

 

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