Category Archives: Culture

History in Gs

It is an interesting how these international meetings of powerful nations have grown as a social phenomenon. Are they nearing the end of their natural development.

 

G 5       1974
G 6       1975
G 7       1976
G 8      1997
G 20    1999
G 2      2005
G 0      2017

What should we do now in the United States after the 2016 election?

What is my take-away from the US election? Pretty simple. We need to form a new political party that has a real core of committed members and that is not corrupt like the Democratic and Republican parties. It must draw its power primarily from  a deep commitment to the needs of ordinary citizens. We need to go back to Democracy, you might say.

 The United States of Batman

Dissecting American Politics at the Cineplex

with Italy’s leading cultural critic

Giuseppe Sacco

 

Foto senza Occhialithe dark knight

Emanuel Pastreich

November 7, 2015

  Read more of this post

“임마누엘페스트라이쉬에게 대한민국이란?” (국가브랜드공모전 관련 인터뷰)

인쇄

제가 한국문화과 관련해서 문제부 국가브랜드공모전
인터뷰시리스 에 참석 했어요. 그인터뷰는 짧은 동영상

“임마누엘페스트라이쉬에게 대한민국이란?”

로고되고 있어요. 참고로 제공 합니다.

Games and Reality

I saw this video advertisement in the subway last week. A young women is featured who, along with her friends, is transformed into the characters in the video game itself. . The advertisement represents quite accurately the increasing blending of daily life with game life for young Koreans. It would not be an exaggeration to claim that for some, the life of Read more of this post

“The Islands of Seoul Rhetoric, Culture, and the Human City” Lecture by Professor Marc Shell of Harvard University (Dec. 18, 2014)

“THE ISLANDS OF SEOUL

RHETORIC, CULTURE, AND THE HUMAN CITY”

Islandology

Islandology

 

MARC SHELL

PROFESSOR OF ENGLISH LITERATURE

HARVARD UNIVERSITY

 shjell

PRESENTED BY:

 

KYUNG HEE UNIVERSITY

KYUNG HEE CYBER UNIVERSITY

THE ASIA INSTITUTE

 

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 18

7 PM

 

Read more of this post

Seoul’s visual culture

I am fascinated by Seoul’s visual culture. It seems that aspects of commercial art and spontaneous art are frequently combined in harmonious and compelling patterns. Here are a few examples.

 

This strip of concrete above a subway entrance includes a compelling combination of commercial art, graffetti and advant garde art.

This strip of concrete above a subway entrance includes a compelling combination of commercial art, graffetti and advant garde art.

 

A close up of the previous  strip reveals a beetle on a  tiny poster and an even smaller poster entitled "NEF" (or, in even smaller print, "never ending fun").

A close up of the previous strip reveals a beetle on a tiny poster and an even smaller poster entitled “NEF” (or, in even smaller print, “never ending fun”).

 

Seoul Graffiti

Seoul Graffiti

Poster my daughter drew and posted in the hall of our apartment building

With a slight mistake in the hangul text, the warning states that tobacco is prohibited as are cigarette butts.

IMG_0081

Emanuel talks about his book “A Different Republic of Korea” at the Seoul Book Forum

Emanuel spoke with an audience of book lovers at the Seoul Book Forum (September 11, 2013) about his book “A Different Korea” and engaged in a long discussion about the value of Korean traditional culture. The four members of the discussion group wore the traditional Korean hats of teacher and students.

9 11 book concert

The entire event is available at

http://www.ustream.tv/channel/bookforum

 

In addition, a collection of short reviews of the book are available at

 

http://book.naver.com/bookdb/review.nhn?bid=7289605

 

 

 

Inverted feudalism

Inverted feudalism

One of the most fascinating phenomena of the current day is the odd structure of government with regards to international relations and national politics, one in which it is local government that is more innovative and more open to concrete international exchange. The waning nation states are suggesting in their action a form of “inverted feudalism.” I formulated this term to describe the current relationship between the central government and local government, drawing on Benjamin Barber’s innovative writings about the new global role of cities and his proposal for a Parliament of Mayors.

In a nutshell, inverted feudalism refers to the tendency of national governments to behave in an increasingly feudalistic manner, inflexible to institutional change and hostile to international exchange except in the extremely limited form of high volume international trade via container ships between multinational corporations. Read more of this post