Category Archives: Today in Japan

“THE ROAD TO A SHRINKING SOCIETY” MATSUHISA HIROSHI MAY 15, 2017

ASIA INSTITUTE SEMINAR

6:00-7:30 PM

 

Monday, MAY 15, 2017

 

“THE ROAD TO A SHRINKING SOCIETY”

How to make ourselves truly renewable

 

WCO ANGUK

3RD FLOOR

(SEE MAP)

MATSUHISA HIROSHI

PROFESSOR  EMERITIS

KYOTO UNIVERSITY

SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING

After the meltdowns at the Fukushima nuclear power plants in 2011, Japanese public opinion has been divided into three groups: those who want to continue using it, those who want to phase it out and those who want to end its use immediately. The establishment has argued that nuclear power is required for the economy and recently the Abe Administration has pushed for restarting plants as part of his agenda for growth.

The choice is one rather of choosing the future of Japan and goes far beyond nuclear power. If we continue this rate of “growth” we will exhaust all our resources in the near future. Even 2% growth will assure us that we will use up what resources we have in fifty years, rather than one hundred.

War and catastrophe will be the consequences of the radical exhaustion of resources.

         There is much talk about a sustainable society today, but the term “sustainable” is used in a vague sense with no concrete guidelines.

Some in industry see it as meaning the sustaining of current growth into the future, the complete opposite of the environmentalists demand for limited consumption.

We must face the truth and reduce real consumption. If we reduce consumption by 1% every year, a 100 year reserve can be continued indefinitely. If we reduce more than that, we can build up a reserve. We must design a smaller society for the sake of future generations in order to avoid catastrophe.

The current economic system is based on mass production and mass consumption. As a result, our lives are flooded with industrial products to which we have become addicted. Our ever-growing society is already showing the signs of discordance as a result of this consumption illness.  A smaller society, on the other hand, supports local production and consumption, and requires less energy. We will have a more healthy society if people are not addicted to industrial products and anonymous consumption but rather nurture each other and promote a creative life.

WCO Anguk

“Peer-to-Peer Science: The Century-Long Challenge to Respond to Fukushima” (Foreign Policy in Focus September 3, 2013)

Foreign Policy in Focus

“Peer-to-Peer Science: The Century-Long Challenge to Respond to Fukushima”

September 3, 2013.

Emanuel Pastreich

(with Layne Hartsell)

 

 

More than two years after an earthquake and tsunami wreaked havoc on a Japanese power plant, the Fukushima nuclear disaster is one of the most serious threats to public health in the Asia-Pacific, and the worst case of nuclear contamination the world has ever seen. Radiation continues to leak from the crippled Fukushima Daiichi site into groundwater, threatening to contaminate the entire Pacific Ocean. The cleanup will require an unprecedented global effort.

Initially, the leaked radioactive materials consisted of cesium-137 and 134, and to a lesser degree iodine-131. Of these, the real long-term threat comes from cesium-137, which is easily absorbed into bodily tissue—and its half-life of 30 years means it will be a threat for decades to come. Recent measurements indicate that escaping water also has increasing levels of strontium-90, a far more dangerous radioactive material than cesium. Strontium-90 mimics calcium and is readily absorbed into the bones of humans and animals.

The Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) recently announced that it lacks the expertise to effectively control the flow of radiation into groundwater and seawater and is seeking help from the Japanese government. TEPCO has proposed setting up a subterranean barrier around the plant by freezing the ground, thereby preventing radioactive water from eventually leaking into the ocean—an approach that has never before been attempted in a case of massive radiation leakage. TEPCO has also proposed erecting additional walls now that the existing wall has been overwhelmed by the approximately 400 tons per day of water flowing into the power plant.

But even if these proposals were to succeed, they would not constitute a long-term solution.

A New Space Race

Solving the Fukushima Daiichi crisis needs to be considered a challenge akin to putting a person on the moon in the 1960s. This complex technological feat will require focused attention and the concentration of tremendous resources over decades. But this time the effort must be international, as the situation potentially puts the health of hundreds of millions at risk. The long-term solution to this crisis deserves at least as much attention from government and industry as do nuclear proliferation, terrorism, the economy, and crime.

To solve the Fukushima Daiichi problem will require enlisting the best and the brightest to come up with a long-term plan to be implemented over the next century. Experts from around the world need to contribute their insights and ideas. They should come from diverse fields—engineering, biology, demographics, agriculture, philosophy, history, art, urban design, and more. They will need to work together at multiple levels to develop a comprehensive assessment of how to rebuild communities, resettle people, control the leakage of radiation, dispose safely of the contaminated water and soil, and contain the radiation. They will also need to find ways to completely dismantle the damaged reactor, although that challenge may require technologies not available until decades from now.

Such a plan will require the development of unprecedented technologies, such as robots that can function in highly radioactive environments. This project might capture the imagination of innovators in the robotics world and give a civilian application to existing military technology. Improved robot technology would prevent the tragic scenes of old people and others volunteering to enter into the reactors at the risk of their own wellbeing.

The Fukushima disaster is a crisis for all of humanity, but it is a crisis that can serve as an opportunity to construct global networks for unprecedented collaboration. Groups or teams aided by sophisticated computer technology can start to break down into workable pieces the immense problems resulting from the ongoing spillage. Then experts can come back with the best recommendations and a concrete plan for action. The effort can draw on the precedents of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, but it must go far further.

In his book Reinventing Discovery: The New Era of Networked Science, Michael Nielsen describes principles of networked science that can be applied on an unprecedented scale. The breakthroughs that come from this effort can also be used for other long-term programs such as the cleanup of the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico or the global response to climate change. The collaborative research regarding Fukushima should take place on a very large scale, larger than the sequencing of the human genome or the maintenance of the Large Hadron Collider.

Finally, there is an opportunity to entirely reinvent the field of public diplomacy in response to this crisis. Public diplomacy can move from a somewhat ambiguous effort by national governments to repackage their messaging to a serious forum for debate and action on international issues. As public diplomacy matures through the experience of Fukushima, we can devise new strategies for bringing together hundreds of thousands of people around the world to respond to mutual threats. Taking a clue from networked science, public diplomacy could serve as a platform for serious, long-term international collaboration on critical topics such as poverty, renewable energy, and pollution control.

Similarly, this crisis could serve as the impetus to make social networking do what it was supposed to do: help people combine their expertise to solve common problems. Social media could be used not as a means of exchanging photographs of lattes and overfed cats, but rather as an effective means of assessing the accuracy of information, exchanging opinions between experts, forming a general consensus, and enabling civil society to participate directly in governance. With the introduction into the social media platform of adequate peer review—such as that advocated by the Peer-to-Peer Foundation (P2P)—social media can play a central role in addressing the Fukushima crisis and responding to it. As a leader in the P2P movement, Michel Bauwens, suggests in an email, “peers are already converging in their use of knowledge around the world, even in manufacturing at the level of computers, cars, and heavy equipment.”

Here we may find the answer to the Fukushima conundrum: open the problem up to the whole world.

Peer-to-Peer Science

Making Fukushima a global project that seriously engages both experts and common citizens in the millions, or tens of millions, could give some hope to the world after two and a half years of lies, half-truths, and concerted efforts to avoid responsibility on the part of the Japanese government and international institutions. If concerned citizens in all countries were to pore through the data and offer their suggestions online, there could be a new level of transparency in the decision-making process and a flourishing of invaluable insights.

There is no reason why detailed information on radiation emissions and the state of the reactors should not be publicly available in enough detail to satisfy the curiosity of a trained nuclear engineer. If the question of what to do next comes down to the consensus of millions of concerned citizens engaged in trying to solve the problem, we will have a strong alternative to the secrecy that has dominated so far. Could our cooperation on the solution to Fukushima be an imperative to move beyond the existing barriers to our collective intelligence posed by national borders, corporate ownership, and intellectual property concerns?

A project to classify stars throughout the university has demonstrated that if tasks are carefully broken up, it is possible for laypeople to play a critical role in solving technical problems. In the case of Galaxy Zoo, anyone who is interested can qualify to go online and classify different kinds of stars situated in distant galaxies and enter the information into a database. It’s all part of a massive effort to expand our knowledge of the universe, which has been immensely successful and demonstrated that there are aspects of scientific analysis that does not require a Ph.D. In the case of Fukushima, if an ordinary person examines satellite photographs online every day, he or she can become more adept than a professor in identifying unusual flows carrying radioactive materials. There is a massive amount of information that requires analysis related to Fukushima, and at present most of it goes virtually unanalyzed.

An effective response to Fukushima needs to accommodate both general and specific perspectives. It will initially require a careful and sophisticated setting of priorities. We can then set up convergence groups that, aided by advanced computation and careful efforts at multidisciplinary integration, could respond to crises and challenges with great effectiveness. Convergence groups can also serve as a bridge between the expert and the layperson, encouraging a critical continuing education about science and society.

Responding to Fukushima is as much about educating ordinary people about science as it is about gathering together highly paid experts. It is useless for experts to come up with novel solutions if they cannot implement them. But implementation can only come about if the population as a whole has a deeper understanding of the issues. Large-scale networked science efforts that are inclusive will make sure that no segments of society are left out.

If the familiar players (NGOs, central governments, corporations, and financial institutions) are unable to address the unprecedented crises facing humanity, we must find ways to build social networks, not only as a means to come up with innovative concepts, but also to promote and implement the resulting solutions. That process includes pressuring institutions to act. We need to use true innovation to pave the way to an effective application of science and technology to the needs of civil society. There is no better place to start than the I

Read more of this post

Emanuel’s apartment in Tokyo (August 1988 to July 1992)

My apartment near Senkawa Station (Yurakucho Line) in Tokyo was an incredibly important space for me where I did much of my reading and thinking during my five years in Japan. I came across a few photographs that I would like to share.

 

The exterior of the apartment building "Hikari Abitation." I lived on the right side of the third floor.

The exterior of the apartment building “Hikari Abitation.” I lived on the right side of the third floor.

The kitchen with a view of the bathroom.

The kitchen with a view of the bathroom.

The rest of the apartment . Note the reproductions of paintings I have attached.

The rest of the apartment . Note the reproductions of paintings I have attached.

1991 apart bed

The desk where I wrote my MA thesis.

The desk where I wrote my MA thesis.

My bed and the porch where I dried my laundry.

My bed and the porch where I dried my laundry.

縮小社会の風呂敷

 

 

縮小社会1縮小社会

Debate about the diplomatic crisis in Japan

“Debate about the diplomatic crisis in Japan”

Emanuel Pastreich

I had a chance to visit Japan to speak with individuals who are deeply concerned with the challenge of creating a  healthy and peaceful order in Northeast Asia last week. This was the first time I have had a chance to engage in such a broad engagement with Japanese scholars, diplomats, politicians and ordinary citizens in the last 14 years. I was deeply impressed by the sincerity I saw in the efforts of the people I met and by the rising concern among ordinary citizens about how the foreign policy of Japan has been hijacked by a small group of special interests whose agenda is increasingly narrow and, mimicking the United States, is increasingly drawn to military solutions for all problems.

My first talk hosted by the New Diplomacy Initiative (新外交イニシアティブ) (March 4, 2016) in Tokyo at the National Assembly. The topic was “Towards a new comprehensive framework for arms limitations: The United States and Security in East Asia”「米国と東アジアの安全保障 ―包括的な軍縮の枠組みに向けて―」. The discussion was led by the founder of the New Diplomacy Initiative, Ms. Saruta Sayo 猿田 佐世. Ms. Saruta is an international lawyer who has dedicated herself to exploring new prospects for an integrated and innovative approach to diplomacy in Japan which takes into account the overlap between security, trade, diplomacy and nonproliferation. The group included many experts from journalism, diplomacy and academics, as well as several very enthusiastic students. Read more of this post

“Future Life with Pepper” @ Softbank

Japan faces an unprecedented collapse in its population and a rapidly aging society. Moreover, more and more Japanese find themselves living alone, often unmarried and without children. It is in this context that Softbank, launched a new domestic robot “Pepper” which is aimed as much as serving as a companion as it is as a tool.

 

 

maxresdefault1215-1

 

In the following video, Pepper is shown serving as a cheerleader of sorts for various families. Most striking is the

lonely woman in the first scene who seeks comfort and affection from Pepper.

 

Pepper is above all a reminder that the combination of an aging, childless society with computer technology developing at an

exponential rate will produce some rather unusual social phenomena. Above all, we are reminded that the future is not that far away at

all. Like climate change, it is already here with us right now.

 

 

Here is the video used in the ad:

 

“Future life with Pepper”

 

http://www.softbank.jp/robot/movies/20150618/

“Japan’s Peace Constitution is the future, not the past” (Asia Today 2015-08-13)

Asia Today

“Japan’s Peace Constitution is the future, not the past”

2015-08-13

Emanuel Pastreich

Japan’s future role in global security is the most significant question in the minds of many in East Asia on the seventieth anniversary of the end of the Pacific War. Unfortunately, the drive of the conservatives in Tokyo to develop an assertive conventional military, something they consider to be a prerequisite to status as a “normal country” has resulted in an exponential rise in political tensions in East Asia and deep questions about what Japan’s long-term motives are.

Many within Japan itself question the rationale for such a rapid push to beef up the Japanese military, slough off the restrictions on military action dictated by the peace constitution and put Japan on a path to serving as a major supplier of weapons technology with a military that is activel engaged around the world.

Towards this goal Japan has embraced the ambiguous concept of “collective defense” which allows it to interpret its way out of the completely unambiguous Article Nine of the Constitution,  “land, sea, and air forces, as well as other war potential, will never be maintained.”

Japanese conservatives suggest that Japan needs to shoulder its international responsibilities as a member of the G-7 and become a “normal nation” that can project military force. Although, in fact, Japan, with the seventh largest military budget, has gone already far beyond any normal nation in terms of its spending.

I can certainly understand the desire of the Japanese to be leaders and play a central role in international affairs. After all, Japan has a powerful economy, some of the most advanced technology and a remarkable cultural tradition. But the Japanese need to ask themselves a serious question: will Japan be a more of a global leader if it abandons its peace constitution, or if it embraces it and enhances it?

Many frown on any suggestions that the peace constitution might be relevant to our age. Recently, Robert Dujarric, a leading Japan security expert, went as far as to write that, “Article 9…is incompatible with surviving in a dangerous world. It’s a noble aspiration but is not policy-relevant.”

But what exactly is incompatible about the “peace constitution” and survival? Without any doubt the greatest threat today is from climate change, which will devastate the major coastal cities of Asia, dramatically reduce food productivity and make large regions of the world uninhabitable. A recent study headed by James Hansen, the former director of NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies, suggests that staying within the internationally agreed goal of keeping the planet within the 2-degree Celsius temperature warming limit will not avoid the melting of the Antarctic and Greenland glaciers. The inevitable result will be the flooding of numerous major cities, like Tokyo, Shanghai and Busan, with seawater.

A “peace constitution” could be a major advantage to Japan as it works together with nations around the world to respond to this existential threat. For example, the peace constitution would force the country to dedicate its resources to emerging non-security threats, thereby making it far more prepared for the challenges of climate change because it does not spend as much on tanks and planes and other technologies that are not relevant to survival in a warming world. The result would not be a Japan that is not punching its weight in military affairs, but rather a Japan that is truly a leader for the first time in security issues.

Japan already has the advanced technologies related to climate change adaptation and mitigation, solar and wind power, electric batteries, and other systems for responding to an increasingly inhospitable environment.

Rather than trying to model Japan’s security strategy on that of the United States, a country that is in serious trouble because of its military over-extension, Japan should move in a more constructive direction, focusing on the one security threat that all experts agree on.

The Self-defense forces could be transformed into organizations that fully support the import of article nine, rather than contradict it, and thereby become models for positive institutional innovation.

For example, the future Ground Self-Defense Force could focus on the global battle against desertification and mass its resources to address the degradation of land and the destruction of forests around the world.

The Maritime Self-Defense Force could focus its attention on addressing the rising temperature of the ocean and the threat posed to the world by its growing acidification. The Self-Defense Force could also give attention to humanitarian relief related to climate change and stopping the dangerous overfishing of the oceans. Finally, the Air Self-Defense Force could devote its resources to the surveying the impact of global warming from the air and addressing problems related to the atmosphere.

It is no simple task to reinvent military. But it is not the first time in history that new circumstances have forced a radical rethinking of security priorities. Better to look at this challenge as an opportunity for Japan to return to its tradition of brave innovation and institutional reform. Finally, such a security strategy requires close engagement with nations throughout Asia and around the world that could make Japan the center of a new security network dedicated to this emerging threat.

The move beyond a conventional military is not an unrealistic pacifist impulse, but rather a historic decision by Japan to address the changing nature of security directly. Although Japan did not have had full autonomy to choose the peace constitution, Japan can chose its destiny this time, positioning itself to lead as nations around the world recalibrate to address the threat of climate change.

Read more of this post

WHAT DEMOCRACY MEANS TO US?

 

A SEMINAR ON DEMOCRACY IN EAST ASIA BY MEMBERS OF PEACE EAST ASIA

 

 

PRODUCED BY:

PEACE EAST ASIA

WITH THE SUPPORT OF

THE ASIA INSTITUTE

 

 AI logo small

Participants:

 

Discussion Members:

Jingyu GAO  (China)

LeoYao LU  (China)

Myeongsu Ryu TODA  (ROK)

Sunny Chan Yiu LAM  (HK)

Shi Pong LEE  (HK)

Yumiko SHIMOGAKI  (Japan)

 

Moderator:

Emanuel Pastreich (United States)

(Director, The Asia Institute)

 

(Based on a series of discussions held on October 5, November 15, November 22, and December 6, 2014)

 

 

Opening Remarks by Emanuel Pastreich (United States)

This seminar presented us with a valuable opportunity to learn about each other, and also to learn about our own perspectives and our own biases. We came to the question of democracy, and specifically the case of Hong Kong, with a general impression the issue based on how we saw it presented in the media. But in fact that are many aspects of politics in Hong Kong and of democracy today that we do not understand all that well. The very term “democracy” is not a given like “tomato” or “oxygen” but rather a vague term subject to an infinite number of interpretations. The value of this effort by youth from many different countries to create a platform for an honest and non-political discussion about the important issues of our age is critical to our future and it is an honor to be here today for this event.

I was struck by the sincerity of the questions raised and the care of the responses given in the course of this discussion. There was a sincerity that was striking about the discussion and I was touched by the clear desire of the students to understand the problems in Hong Kong in a larger context. By extending their discussion to all of Asia, and avoiding a narrow definition of democracy, they have opened the way to a constructive dialog that will extend to the rest of Asia, and to the world.

Youth in Hong Kong are facing incredible pressures. They face economic pressures related to the breakdown of the economic system that supported their parents; political pressures related to the immense influence that other nations have on Hong Kong because of its links to global capital; social pressures related to an aging society and the profound alienation among young people today. Read more of this post

“동아시아 | 무기여, 잘 가거라!” (허핑턴포스트 2014년 10월 29일)

허핑턴포스트코리아_개천에서-용나기-프로젝트_특성화-700x260

허핑턴포스트

 

“동아시아 | 무기여, 잘 가거라!”

 

2014년 10월 29일

 

Emanuel Pastreich 

임마누엘 페스트라이쉬 · The Asia Institute 소장, 경희대 국제대 교수

John Feffer 

존 페퍼 · Foreign Policy in Focus 편집장

 

현재 동아시아 지역은 수많은 난관에 봉착해 있다. 동아시아 각국은 영토문제와 역사문제로 서로 반목하고, 자원 쟁탈에 혈안이 되어 있으며, 그리고 환태평양에 있어서의 세력균등 문제로 서로 충돌하고 있다. 이러한 모든 문제에 대응하기 위해 미국은 자유무역을 확대해 나갈 것을 제안해 왔다. 미국이 동아시아에서 추진하고 있는 TPP(환태평양경제동반자협정)이라 알려져 있는 자유무역협정의 비준은, 지금으로서는 성공할 전망이 보이질 않는다. 그러는 동안 워싱턴에서는 무기판매와 부담의 분담으로 회귀해 버렸다.

오바마 정권의 아시아 회귀전략은 지역 내 분쟁에 대한 미국의 군사적 대응조치의 최신판이라고밖에 볼 수 없다. 오랫동안 워싱턴은 동아시아의 동맹국에 고가의 미국산 무기시스템 도입과, GDP의 많은 부분을 방어에 소비하도록 강요해 왔다. 그러나 이것을 맹목적으로 믿고 따른 결말은 대참극이라고도 할 수 있는 분쟁으로 이어질 지도 모르고, 만약 그렇게 된다면 아이러니하게도 그때 가서 미국은 이 지역에서 영향력을 잃게 될 것이다.

오늘날 동아시아의 경제번영은 세계의 선망의 대상이 되었다. 그러나 최근 이 지역 내에서 증가하는 군사비 지출은 100년 전의 유럽의 상황과 비슷하다고 할 수 있는데 그 심각성은 훨씬 크다. 실제로 동아시아 각국은 세계에서 가장 많은 군사비를 지출하고 있다. 군사비 지출만 보면 중국은 세계 제2위, 일본은제8위, 그리고 한국은 제10위로, 그 순위를 높여 가고 있다. 또한 세계 제3위의 군사비 지출국인 러시아는 그 지형적 특색과 중국과 함께 북한과의 관계성을 염두에 둔다면 동아시아에 있어서도 중요한 국가라 할 수 있다. 게다가 세계 제13위의 군사비 지출국인 호주 또한 동아시아 지역에서의 중요성이 높아지고 있다.

그렇긴 하지만 미국을 제외한 상위 8개국의 군사비 지출 총액을 모두 더하더라도 미국이 지출하는 군사비에는 미치질 못한다는 것이 현실이다. 환태평양지역에서의 미국의 군사비 지출, 특히 해군력에 대한 할당은 미미한 증가에 그치고 있지만 그것이 중국을 향해 있다는 것은 자명할 뿐만 아니라 동맹국에게 군사비 지출의 증강을 강요하고 있다.

이런 가운데 미국의 정가에서는 이러한 국가들이 보다 강한 대항세력이 되어 주기를 바라는 목소리가 여전히 주류를 이루고 있다. 예를 들면 CSIS의 마이클 그린(Michael Green) 씨는 빅터 차(Victor Cha) 씨와 함께 괌 해역에서 핵을 중심으로 하는 해군 군비를 두 배로 증강하고, 하와이에서 육해군의 군비 증강과 더불어 한국에는 군함을 상주시키고, 괌에서는 반영구적으로 폭격부대를 배치해 동아시아에 대한 감시를 강화해 나가야 한다고 주장하고 있다. 이러한 도발적이라고도 할 수 있는 대응은 중국의 국경 주변에서 이미 분쟁의 불씨가 되고 있을 정도로 긴장감을 고조시키고 있다.

또한 이러한 문제와는 별도로 동아시아는 심각한 안보의 위기, 특히 기후변화와 확대되어 가는 소득격차에 대비하기 위한 대응책을 필요로 하고 있다. 그러나 실제로 무슨 일이 일어나고 있는가 하면 미국의 동아시아 지역 내의 개입은, 예를 들면 한국정부의 필요성이 없다고 하는 견해와는 반대로 THAAD(고고도미사일방어)라는 거액의 방어미사일프로그램을 구입하게 하는 확실한 힘으로 작용했다. 마찬가지로 이러한 군사시설을 상주시키는 것에 대한 중국의 당연한 우려에 대해서는 대화를 하려는 자세도 보이지 않은 채 무시되어 왔다.

동아시아에서 더 큰 문제는 핵무기의 등장이다. 예를 들면 과거에는 최소한의 군비밖에 보유하지 않았던 중국도 지금은 방위, 미사일방어프로그램의 증강을 목적으로 급속한 근대화 정책을 실시하고 있다. 규모와 사정거리가 여전히 미지수이긴 해도 최근 들어 북한은 핵무기 위력을 확대해 주변국을 위협하고 있는데, 이는 주변국들이 다시 핵무기에 관심을 갖게 하는 요인이 되고 있다. 그리고 서울과 도쿄에 있어 보면 핵무기 철폐를 외치는 목소리는 사라지고 자기방어라는 명목 하에 핵보유를 찬성하는 목소리가 점점 커지고 있음을 알 수가 있다. (미국에서 나온 몇 가지 견해는 그러한 목소리를 부추기고 있다)

게다가 오바마 정권은 핵무기 철폐를 찬성하고, 그 이용에 대해 러시아와 화해교섭을 진행하고 있음에도 불구하고 국내의 무기공장을 정비하며 수십억 달러나 되는 거액의 자금을 쏟아 붓고 있다.

미국의 정치가들은 동맹국과 긴밀한 협력을 강화하는 방법으로 나날이 힘을 키워가고 있는 중국을 견제할 수 있으리란 꿈을 꾸고 있는 것이 틀림없다. 그러나 발생 가능한 분쟁은 이러한 계획과 맞아 떨어지지는 않을 것이다. 예를 들면 한국과 일본은 영토와 역사에 관한 논쟁을 벌일 때는 독자적 입장을 견지한다. 표면적인 구실로 북한을 이용한다 하더라도 일본의 군사비 증강은 필연적으로 한국과 중국에게 있어서는 직접적인 위협으로 받아들여질 것이다. 마찬가지로 베트남에서의 군사력 강화는 중국과는 직접 관계가 없다 하더라도 충분히 동남아시아에서의 군사력 경쟁의 도화선이 될 수 있다.

유럽의 사례

1970년대, 유럽이 군비경쟁과 전쟁에서 벗어나 통합된 평화로운 지역으로 나아가기 위해 군비제한교섭을 시작한 것은 불가피한 일이었다. 데탕트 시기, 미국과 소련은 군사경쟁의 위험성을 깨닫고 군비제한교섭을 시작해 핵무기 통제 및 각종 재래무기에 대해 규제를 가하기로 했다.

1970년대 초, 미소 양국은 냉전에 의한 분열에 대처하기 위해 세 방향에서 접근했다. 첫 번째는 모스크바와 워싱턴의 핵무기에 관한 양자 간 협정이고, 두 번째는 유럽안전보장협력회의(CSCE)의 정치적・경제적 토의였다. 그리고 마지막으로 중부유럽상호병력군비삭감교섭(MBFR)의 협정에 따라 유럽의 군축을 실행하는 것이었다. MBFR는 결과적으로 1989년에 바르샤바조약기구와 북대서양조약기구(NATO) 간의 대화로 이어지며 실질적인 군비삭감을 이루어냈다. 또한 냉전 후에는 유럽통상전력조약이 NATO와 러시아 간의 진일보한 군비삭감 협의를 시작하는 플랫폼이 되었다.

1970년대부터 1980년대까지 유럽의 군비증강은 현재의 동아시아 상황보다 안전하지 않았다. 데탕트 시대 여러 군축회담이 성공했던 사례가 있었음에도 불구하고, 1979년 소련의 아프카니스탄 침공과 레이건 정부의 등장으로 냉전의 긴장은 다시 고조되었다. 그렇지만 핵무기와 재래무기에 관한 통제협정은1970년대 꾸준히 실시되었으며 안정적이고도 평화적인 유럽을 구축하기 위해 필요한 기반을 제공했다.

이와 같은 오랜 기간 동안의 군사규제협정의 경험으로 정치가, 정책결정자, 군사전문가은 군사예산을 확대해 긴장관계를 만드는 것이 아니라 어떻게 하면 긴장완화를 이룰 수 있는지에 대해 진지하게 생각하게 되었다. 군사적 차원의 삭감뿐만 아니라 신뢰구축을 위해 필요한 긴밀한 시스템을 고안해 나갔다. 그리고 민간, 정부 차원의 대화가 늘어나면서 보다 많은 관계자들이 긴장완화에 나설 수 있는 환경을 만들었으며, 정치적 리더십 변화에 관계없이 군비통제와 군축협정을 계속해 나갈 수 있게 만든 것이다.

한편, 아시아는 이와 비교할 수 있는 군비통제와 군축의 역사가 없다. 일본이 1922년 초 처음으로 워싱턴회의에 참가해 군사통제회의 및 전쟁을 제한하는 협의에 나서기는 했지만 결과적으로 1936년에 협의를 파기함으로써 끝이 났다.

전후 유일하게 아시아의 군사통제라 할 수 있는 것은 일본의 평화헌법 채택과 군사행동에 대한 국권의 포기였다. 그러나 다른 국가는 그와 같은 정책을 채택하지 않았다. 일본에 평화헌법의 채택을 강요했던 미국이 특히 그러했다. 1991년 미국은 냉전 후 군비를 축소하기 위해 한국의 전략적 핵무기를 제거했지만 그것은 상징적인 행위에 지나지 않아 이를 포괄적 군축정책이라 말하기 어려웠다.

재균형’을 넘어

현재 “재균형”이라 불리는 동아시아에 대한 미국의 전략은 완전한 재구성을 필요로 한다.

외교 정책의 기본은 값비싼 무기시스템 판매가 아니라 무엇보다 상호 안전보장이 되어야 할 것이다. 향후 5년 동안 미국과 그 동맹파트너인 일본, 한국, 호주는 이 지역의 군사 대국인 중국, 러시아와 아세안 회원국들과 함께 핵무기와 재래식 무기 규제 등 포괄적 계획의 준비 작업을 위해 만나야 할 것이다.

군비제한에 대한 합의는 이 지역의 안전을 위협하는 중요한 요소인 기후변화를 인식하면서 함께 이어져 나가야 한다.

이미 그러한 접근에 대한 중요한 지지, 즉 기후변화가 안보를 위협하는 중요한 문제라는 것은 미 태평양사령부의 지휘자인 사무엘 록클리어 3세(Samuel J. Locklear III) 제독의 성명에 의해 명시된 바 있다. 앤드류 드윗(DeWit)이 언급했듯이 미 태평양사령부는 아시아 전역의 미래 협력을 위한 새로운 전기가 될 기후문제에 대한 협의에 참여할 것을 약속했다. 기후변화는 군축으로 이어지는 안보상의 변혁에 기여해야 할 것이다.

중국과의 관계는 성공을 위한 필수조건이다. 중국은 미국을 지역에서 환영하지 못할 존재로 단정 짓고 있지는 않다. 워싱턴에도 강경파들이 있듯이 북경에도 물론 강경론자가 있기는 하지만, 중국은 일관되게 군사협력을 포함한 안보문제에 있어서 미국과 협력할 용의가 있음을 표명해왔다. 중국은 림팩( RIMPAC) 2014 등과 같이 미국이 주도하는 환태평양군사훈련에도 참가한 바가 있다. 그러나 중국 연안지역에서의 군사적 과시는 북경으로 하여금 미국이 조정자 역할보다는 중국의 잠재적 위협을 억압하려는 패권주의자라는 우려를 불러 일으켰다. 세계의 미래는 많은 부분 중국이 국제사회의 행동기준을 받아들이느냐와, 미국이 냉전시대의 외교와 안보의 사고방식에서 벗어나느냐에 달려 있다. 미국이 중국과 장기적 군축합의를 이룬다면 양국 관계는 변할 수 있다.

앞으로 나아가는 방법

미국은 세계에서 군사 장비에 가장 많은 돈을 지출하는 국가임과 동시에 가장 많은 무기를 판매하는 국가이다. 따라서 동아시아의 포괄적 군비축소 합의를 위한 첫 단계는 워싱턴에서 시작되어야 할 것이다. 워싱턴은 군비 경쟁의 고조보다 군축 및 신뢰 구축 조치에 대한 약속을 수용하는 리더십을 보여 주어야 한다.

어떤 군축합의도 양자 간이 아닌 다자간 협의로 이루어져야 한다. 현재 동아시아에 있어서 군비 증강은 모든 국가가 관련되어 있다는 사실과, 긴장 원인이 복잡하며 종래의 동맹과 일치하지 않는다는 것을 인식하는 것이 중요하다. 북한의 핵개발 계획에 과도한 초점을 맞추다 보니 더 큰 지역적 안보문제를 제대로 보지 못하고 있다.

이와 같은 합의에는 이를 담당할 기구가 필요하다. 아시아 태평양의 ASEAN지역포럼과 안보협력회의는 최초의 대화의 장이 될 수 있을 것이다. 성숙한 포괄적 군비통제 기구는 결국 새로운 계기를 필요로 한다.

6자회담은 군축에 대한 심도 있는 토의를 위한 최초의 출발기구로서의 역할을 할 수 있다. 북한의 핵개발 프로그램을 무조건 종료하라는 요구를 장황하게 되풀이하기보다는 오히려 회원국 – 미국, 중국, 일본, 러시아, 한국, 북한 – 은 핵무기를 제거하고 지역 내 재래무기를 대량으로 감축해 나가는 방법에 대한 협의를 시작해야 한다. 이와 같은 협의는 북한 당국의 행동에 의존하거나 제한되어서는 안 될 것이며, 오히려 북한 당국의 행동에 관계없이 실행할 수 있는 더 큰 안보기구 창출의 기초가 되어야 한다. 하지만 협의를 통해 북한이 중국, 일본, 한국과 동참하여 군비를 감축하는 것에 합의하는 대신 미군의 규모를 줄이는 것과 같은 혜택이 주어져야 한다.

북한을 이 합의에 참여하게 하는 분명한 인센티브는 미국이 1953년 한국전쟁을 종식하는 휴전협정을 평화협정으로 바꾸는 협상을 제안하는 것이다. 이러한 평화협정-북한은 이를 위해 로비를 벌여왔다-은 또한 이를 준수하기 위한 지역기구를 만드는 방법에 대한 규정을 포함해야 한다. 그리고 이 메커니즘은 새로운 지역안전보장 구조의 핵심이 될 수 있다.

6자 간의 최초의 합의는 1995년 존 엔디곳 John Endicott 교수가 제안한 ‘the Limited Nuclear-Weapons-Free Zone in Northeast Asia‘에 대한 미국의 지지선언에 의해 힘을 얻었다. 이 제안은 북한을 제외한 6자회담의 모든 국가의 군사전문가들에 의해 만들어졌으며, 이 지역의 모든 핵무기가 최종적 폐기로 나아가는 첫걸음에 기여하였다. 이 때 제안된 NTFZ((비핵지대)는 남극 비핵지대 조약(1959), 동남아시아 비핵지대(1995) 등 이미 발효된 8개의 비핵지대의 전례에 기반하여 창설된다는 점에서 효과적이었다.

핵무기에 대한 협상은 MBFR회담의 전례에 따라 이 지역의 군비감축에 관한 일련의 협상과 나란히 이루어져야 한다. 이러한 논의는 군축 제안 및 예측 가능한 순서에 따라 실행하는 로드맵 등 지속적인 메커니즘으로 발전할 수 있었다. 특정 부분에 대한 협의에서는 해군함정, 전차, 그리고 대포, 항공기와 폭격기,미사일 방위 및 기타 운반 장치 등에 대한 논의를 진행할 수 있다. 이 협정에는 또한 군사훈련 감시에 대한 엄격한 규칙을 제시하고, 이를 준수하는지를 모니터링 할 수 있는 장치를 포함시켜야 한다. 결국 이러한 회담의 핵심 요소는 지역 내에서의 도발적 감시 프로그램의 중단과 더불어 주요한 군사훈련의 사후 관리이다.

게다가 기술 변화의 빠른 속도가 점차 재래식 무기를 현대식 무기로 바꾸어가고 있기 때문에 재래식 무기에 대한 협의 또한 계속해서 진화해야 한다. 무인 항공기(drone), 로봇, 3D 프린팅과 사이버전쟁과 같은 신기술에 대해서도 무기조약을 통해 해결해 나가야 한다. 지속성을 위해 기술 변화의 파괴적인 부분에 대해 모든 군축조약 내에 분명히 명시되어야 한다.

전역(戰域) 미사일 방위는 포괄적 무기조약의 한 부분으로 다루어야 한다. 미사일 방어시스템의 유효성을 둘러싼 기술적인 문제에도 불구하고, 한국과 일본에 시스템 확장을 적용하려 하는 미국의 제안은 이에 상응하는 중국의 탄도미사일 기술 개발을 촉진하며 불안정을 초래했다.

중국은 마사일 방위가 방어적인 것이라는 미국의 입장을 받아들이지 않고 있다. 그 결과 미국이 미사일 방위는 군축협의의 최종 단계에서 제거할 것이라고 주장하는 반면, 중국은 이를 제일 먼저 삭제해야 한다고 주장하고 있다. 이 문제는 진지한 협상을 통해서만 해결할 수 있을 것이다.

끝으로 기후변화의 완화와 적응에 대한 협의는 핵무기와 재래식 무기에 대한 협의와 병행하는 것이 중요하다. 기존의 핵 군비를 줄이는 것은 지금까지 군의 기능에 변화를 필요로 할 것이다. 수백만 명의 사람들을 고용하는 거대한 관료기구인 군대에 기후변화에 대응하는 중요한 역할을 맡겨야 된다.

지난 일 년 간 세계는 우크라이나, 이라크, 그리고 가자지구에서 일어난 충돌을 목격하며 곤혹스러워했다. 이들 분쟁지역에서는 모든 측면에서 군사적 대응을 선택했기 때문에 상황은 점점 악화되었다. 한편으로 동아시아의 위기는 지난 몇 개월 동안 잠잠해졌다. 이것은 지난 수년 간 이 지역을 괴롭혀왔던 수많은 분쟁을 해결하는 데 있어 다른 접근 방식의 가능성을 제공하는 이상적 시기였다. 만약 아시아가 분쟁을 해결하는 수단으로써 무력을 포기한다면 그것은 세계의 다른 지역에 강력한 메시지를 던지는 것이 될 것이다.

* 이 글은 허핑턴포스트 미국판 일본판에도 게재됐습니다.

Read more of this post

“The Problem with Islands” (perspectives on the Senkaku Problem)

“The Problem with Islands”

Emanuel Pastreich
The Asia Institute

April 6, 2014

Several Chinese friends have asked me write about the issue of islands, specifically the Diaoyutai Islands that have come to completely dominate the discussions of Chinese if one asks about Japan. They asked me to write about the Diaoyutai Islands because they felt that I can be objective. In a sense I am objective as a speaker, but perhaps I am not objective in the sense that they imagine.
As an American, I can say a few words about islands. Let us talk about the Hawaii Islands that the United States made a territory in 1893. They were made a territory, and eventually a state, after an illegal coup staged to overthrow the independent government of Hawaii under Queen Liliʻuokalani. More importantly, we know that the land occupied by the United States today, almost all of it possessed by people who came from Europe, once belonged to native people, the Navaho, the Cherokee, the Sioux and many other tribes whose names have been forgotten. Their land was taken away from them in the most unethical manner. It was taken by theft, through broken treaties, and in many cases through wanton murder and thievery.
And today, where do we stand? Many Americans have forgotten that history. And Chinese are not all that interested either in how the United States was built. Such cruelty is not new in human history, and expansionism is found in many so-called “advanced countries.” But I doubt that such behavior is something uniquely American, or Japanese. It is part of the cruelty of human nature and is manifested in the countries that, for domestic reasons choose military and economic expansion. Without such expansion, Europe and the United States could not have become so prosperous, nor could Japan.

Read more of this post